Cross Stitches for Friends

So, I haven’t updated with any cross stitches for a while. Have I not been stitching? Chyeah right. I’m actually just that lazy.

So anyway, today’s a two for one deal, which I’m sure you’re all fabulously grateful for.

Let’s get to it~

Cross Stitch 1

Title: Bluffball.co.uk

Gifted to: @kanhir on the Twitters.

The trouble with Arsenal is they always think that they can walk it.

What was Wenger thinking, sending Walcott on so early?

This was pretty simple, as cross stitches go. I used the same model as I did for my previous IT Crowd stitches (basically, taken from here), and I just added  the current Arsenal strip. It’s going to date pretty quick, but it’s either that or have it already dated. The font is the same as my previous IT Crowd stitch; namely, a modified version of Bitwise.

The footballs… well, they were all me. I can take full credit for their glorious roundness and resemblance to real, live footballs.

I know, I know. It’s hard to be this gifted.

Cross Stitch 2

Title: Discordian Sampler

Gifted to: My very own favourite wickedday <3

Check my Greek writing!

Yeah, this needs a bit of an iron...

One of my biggest projects to date, and definitely the most complicated. The font came from here. The blackwork border is “a band of blossoms“. That whole site is a fountain of blackwork goodness, so please, check it out. The owner takes her inspiration from proper Elizabethan stuff and creates her own patterns from there. The fill pattern for the cornerpieces is third from the left, fourth one down in the first page of these blackwork samplers. It’s a colossal shame that she hasn’t updated since 2009, because her experimental pieces are mindblowingly beautiful. I have a long way to go before I can do anything as amazing as that…

The golden apple (click for embiggened detail) fill stitch is this from here, where sixteenth century stitches are charted for our twenty first century delight. The shape of the apples is mine, as are the little banners and the Greek writing (which spells out ΚΑΛΛΙΣΤΙ – “to/for the most beautiful”).

It took me a good few weeks to finish, and although I didn’t really get the hang of how to do blackwork efficiently, it was a really great experience and a fun project!

I hope the recipients enjoy them as much as I enjoyed making them!

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